Sample Letters to Principal from Parent for Terms, Admission and Teacher Request

Published on February 28th, 2012 by | Category: Writing

1. To the Principal of a School, asking for Terms, &c

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I shall be very much obliged if you will send me a prospectus of your school, giving full particulars as to terms, &c. I have a daughter of twelve whom I wish to send to a boarding school in the autumn. She has so far been educated in the Ealing High School for Girls, and I think has made fair progress. I wish her to pay special attention to French, music, and dancing.

Will you please let me know if you will have a vacancy in the autumn and when I may come down to see the school? I shall also be obliged if you would give me the name and address of anyone whose children have been to the school and who would be willing to answer inquiries.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

2. To Principal, acknowledging Reply

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I thank you for your letter of the 15th, with prospectus. It seems very satisfactory, and I have had a very complimentary letter from Mrs. Ainslie, but I should like to bring my daughter down to see you and the school before making up my mind. As you were kind enough to suggest any Friday, we will come down on Friday next by the 11.17 from Paddington.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

3. To Principal, entering Daughter for School

48 Towns ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

The Principal,

——— School.

DEAR MADAM,

I have now decided to send Phyllis to you in the autunm. I return herewith the Entrance Form duly filled in, and a cheque for £5 to cover the entrance fee. I think, after my conversation with you, you quite under stand my wishes about her education, and I hope you will find her a good pupil. You will, no doubt, let me know later what her requirements will be, and when the autumn term begins.

We shall be abroad for the next three months, but any letters sent to the above address will be forwarded.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

4. To Principal, respecting Pupil’s Complaint

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I have been rather disturbed by the letters I have received lately from Phyllis. She doesn’t seem happy. It is not that she makes any definite complaint, although she grumbles a little about the food not being to her liking, but she seems dispirited and to dislike the life in Some way. It may be just home-sickness, but I thought I would write to you, as there may be some little cause for her lack of Spirits that you could easily remove. Is she quite happy with her companions? Is the work proving too much for her?

I know you will forgive me troubling you on what may be a small matter, but I am sure you are as anxious as we are that Phyllis should not be unhappy at school.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

5. To Principal, respecting an unsatisfactory Report

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I was most disappointed at receiving your report of Phyllis. I cannot understand it. She always seemed so interested in her lessons, and we had hopes of her doing brilliantly. I will talk to her very seriously, but I should be very grateful if you could throw any light upon the cause of her unsatisfactory work and behaviour. I cannot help feeling that there is some influence at work on her that is leading her astray.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

6. To Principal, giving Notice of taking Pupil away

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR Miss WESTON,

I am sorry to tell you that my husband and I have decided to take Phyllis away from school, and I therefore have to give notice that she will be leaving you at the end of next term. I don’t think you will be very much surprised, and I hope you won’t regard our action in any way as a reflection upon you and your school, but Phyllis’s conduct and progress seem so unsatisfactory that we feel we should like to have her under our own observation for a time, and are going to employ a private governess for the present. I would like to thank you for the kindness and attention you have always shown.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

7. To a Lady, inquiring about a School

48 TOWERS ROAD,

EALING, W.5.

DEAR MADAM,

I am thinking of sending my daughter to School, and its Principal, Miss Weston, tells me that your daughters were in her charge and that you would answer any inquiries about the school.

I should be very much obliged if you would tell me if you were always satisfied with the care given to your daughters, if the food and living conditions were quite satisfactory, and if your daughters made good progress in their studies. I am especially anxious that my daughter should have good tuition in French, music, and dancing. Are these subjects well taught

I enclose a stamped envelope and shall be very grateful for any information you can give me.

Yours faithfully,

LENORE ALLEN.

8. Reply

84 MARDEN AVENUE,

SALISBURY.

DEAR MADAM,

All my three daughters went to Miss Weston’s school, and I can say at once that I was always highly satisfied with the care taken of them and their progress. They were always very happy there, and their education was good, although they never attained very high academical honours. They all speak and read French well, but I do not know much about the music and dancing taught there, as all my daughters are unmusical and did not give much time to those subjects.

Yours faithfully,

ISABEL AINSLIE.

9. To Headmaster, complaining of Son being Bullied

84 PELBURY ROAD,

WANDSWORTM, S. W.18.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

My son, Willie Pearce, has come home from school several days lately very much distressed. His ace was bruised, and he had evidently been knocked down. He win not tell me what happened on these occasions, but he is in such a nervous and frightened condition that I think he is being badly bullied and ill-treated by some of the bigger boys. I suspect the ringleader of them to be Alfred Clark. My boy has been very delicate, and is naturally nervous and timid, and I am very much afraid, if this treatment goes on, his health will suffer.

Please don’t think I write in a complaining spirit, or that I want the boys punished, but, if you would make inquiries and do anything in your power to stop my lad being ill-treated, I should be very grateful to you.

Yours faithfully,

ALICE PEARCE.

10. To Headmaster, asking that Son may be excused Sports

84 PELBURY ROAD,

WANDSWORTM, S. W.18.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

The doctor says my son, James Allen, is suffering from a strained heart, and he advises me that he ought not to take any strenuous exercise. I shall be obliged therefore if you will have him excused football and physical trainmg for the next few months.

Yours faithfully,

T. H. ALLEN.

11. To Headmaster, asking that Son might take special Subjects

14 HALMA STREET,

RICHMOND.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

Would it be possible for my son, Thomas Fenn, now in the 5th Form, to have special tuition in French and German? I am hoping he will get through the London Matriculation examination next month, and after that I should like him to give practically all his time to modern languages, as I hope to make him a journalist and they would be of great value to him. I should be glad to hear from you if this could be arranged. He will also need shorthand, but I presume that does not come in the school curriculum.

Yours faithfully,

F. B. FENN.

12. To Headmaster, asking Advice about Son’s Career

84 THE MALL,

HIGHEURY, N.5.

The Headmaster,

——— School.

DEAR SIR,

My son, George Bailey, will be leaving school at the end of this year, and I should be very grateful if you could give me any advice as to a suitable business for him. He is strongly opposed to doing any kind of office work, and I cannot afford to train him for any of the professions. I am afraid I am troubling you a great deal, but I am anxious to do the best I can for the boy, and thought perhaps you might be able to suggest an occupation for which he has shown special aptitude, or might know of openings through which he would obtain work on leaving school. I shall be very much obliged if you can help me.

I could afford to pay a small premium for indentures, and it is not necessary that the lad should begin to earn immediately, but I cannot afford to spend any more money on his training.

Yours faithfully,

A. L. BAILEY.

13. Engaging a Music Master

ACACIA COTTAGE,

TEWEESBURY.

DEAR SIR,

Thank you for your letter of Sept. 26th. 1 am willing to pay two guineas a quarter for weekly music lessons for my daughter, and the time yoif suggest—from 4 to 5 on Mondays—will be quite suitable. I shall be glad if you will start on Monday next, and I hope you will find my daughter a good pupil.

Yours sincerely,

ISABEL BROWN.

14. To a Music Master, complaining of slow Progress

ACACIA COTTAGE,

TEWEESBURY.

DEAR MR. WATSON,

My daughter has been taking lessons from you now for two years, and I am bound to say that I am very much dissatisfied with her progress. Her playing seems to me very poor indeed. Is it that she has no talent for music? Or doesn’t she try to do her best ? I am afraid that, if she does not get on better than this, I shall not think it worth while to continue the lessons.

Yours faithfully,

ISABEL BROWN.

15. Engaging a Tutor for special Coaching

CEDAR HOUSE,

DORKING.

DEAR SIR,

I want my son, who is now sixteen and has just heft ——— School, coached for the London University Matriculation examination. He took it in June last, but failed to get through in Mathematics, which has always been his weak subject. He will need to do revision in all subjects, of course, with special attention given to Mathematics. Will you please let Me know if you can undertake his coaching, what your terms would be, and what hours you would be able to give him?

Yours faithfully,

JOHN H. MAY.

16. Thanking Tutor

CEDAR HOUSE,

DORKING.

DEAR MR. JAMES,

I am very pleased to be able to tell you that my boy has passed the Matriculation examination, being placed in the second class. I am delighted with his success, and wish to thank you very sincerely for the care and attention you gave to coaching him, and to congratulate you on his success. The boy seemed to like working for you, and I think you got the very best out of him.

With very many thanks,

Yours sincerely,

JOHN H. MAY.

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